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   Out, darn spot! Guided Research: Further Research     
the KanCRN Collaborative Research Network


Guided
 Research

  What do want to learn
  What we already know
  What we're going to do
  Share our data
  See others' data
  Picturing the data
  What does data mean?
  More questions
  What do we do now?


Student
 Research

  Publish
  View

When a well designed experiment is performed and sense is made of the collected data, solutions to the research question become clear. Others can learn from these experiments. This is part of how research adds to new knowledge.


Think back to the experiment you conducted:

  • Were you able to answer the research question?
  • Were there problems with the experiment that kept you from finding the answer to the question?
  • Can you make changes or adjustments to the research study so that you can answer the question?
  • Can these questions provide more proof to support your answer?
  • What would those changes be?


Think back to all of the things you did in conducting this research. You sent in much more data than what was necessary to answer our original research question. Take a look at some of that information. Are there any patterns in this new data? Is this creating any new questions for you?

As you were working on this research project did any questions arise?


Are there other methods that could be tried?
Are there other solvents that
could be tried?
Does the brand of a particular solvent affect the ability of the solvent?

Does the brand of Kool-Aid or mustard have an effect on the stains and how easily it is removed?
What about the cloth you used? Are there some variables with the type of cloth that the shirt is made of that would have an effect on the results of your research?

We invite you to share the new questions with others.
To find answers to any of these new questions, you will need to conduct more research. To answer a new question, you will need to conduct a search for more background information. You will need to design an experiment to answer the question. Don’t forget, others must be able to repeat your experiment. You will need to collect data and then make sense of it. Finally, you put it all together in your conclusion.

If it sounds to you like the process is starting all over again, you're right. True research is never really finished. We invite you to conduct research of a spin-off question on your own. After you've done so, we want you to share what you have found. You can publish your research paper on our web site so that others can benefit from your discoveries.

  1999, KanCRN Collaborative Research Network