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   Construction Function Creating the Context: Data Analysis     
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Creating
 the Context

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  Share our data
  See others' data
  Picturing the data
  What does the data
mean?

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Guided
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  What do we want to
learn?

  What we already
know

  What we're going to do
  Share our data
  See others' data
  Picturing the data
  What does the data
mean?

  More questions
  What do we do
now?


Student
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We can now make a picture of the data. Pictures make it easier to understand something.

All of the data you asked for is now in a table. A table will let you see all the data at one time. This makes the data easier to understand. To make the data even easier to understand, we can make a picture of it. A picture of data is called a graph.

There are many different kinds of graphs. The graph that will give us the best picture for our data is called a bar graph.

Choose just one row of data entered.

To make a bar graph, start with a grid.

 

You can make names on the bottom side (horizontal) for the bars you will make on your graph with TRIANGLE, SQUARE, and CIRCLE.

 
 Label the bottom side with the name SHAPES OF PILLARS.  Just like the picture above.
Look at your data for all three pillars from the row you chose. What is the largest number of grams that a pillar supported? This is the highest number that you have to have on the left side (vertical) side of your graph. Count how many squares there are going up on your grid. You have to figure out how you are going to count to make that number fit on your graph (scale).
Will it work if you count by ones? Twos? Threes? Fives? Tens? Hundreds? Write the numbers of the scale on the vertical side. Our example below shows counting by 5's.
Label the side with MASS SUPPORTED (IN GRAMS). 

Choose one color for your bars. Draw the bars for your data.
Choose another set of data. Make a graph for it.

You should make graphs of several sets of data. Once your graphs are made, you are ready to try to understand them.

 Go on

 

 

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