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The conclusions of science depend on experiments. When well-designed experiments are performed and analyzed, many issues may be settled. But the new knowledge derived from well-run experiments also engenders new issues, and this becomes a part of the creative growth of science. Were you able to answer the research question that directed your research? Were there other variables that prevent you from making a claim to knowing something? Can you refine your work to get a better result? These are questions that you should be asking yourself as you continue your work.

Also, as you were working, you no doubt had other areas of concern and interests come up. Remember to refer back to the research questions that have been submitted by the KanCRN community as a part of this guided research.

What are the some of the additional questions?

The great Monarch mystery is: How do inexperienced Monarchs from Colorado to New England and the Canadian provinces all find the same traditional roosts in Mexico each year? What environmental information is used by Monarchs to guide their migratory flights? Do they use the sun as a compass, are they guided by the earth's magnetic field, do they follow structural features of the landscape such as rivers and mountains, or do they use a combination of these, or perhaps some undiscovered method? Because of their small size (0.5 grams), relatively weak flight, and body temperatures which fluctuate with the air temperature, the monarchs' flight and, therefore, the whole migration should be influenced by the weather conditions. And we need to ask: How do weather patterns and climate affect the migration? Once we have the basic information on the effects of these "physical factors", can we use this information to predict when the migrating butterflies will arrive at particular milestones along their migration routes? Can we predict if the migration will move faster or slower in a given year?

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